Cisco Wave2 site survey how-to

So, you have a shiny new Cisco 802.11ac wave 2 Access Point and you went to go grab the autonomous code for it to do an APoS survey – but then realized there isn’t autonomous code for the 2802 or 3802 (or any other wave 2) Cisco AP, huh? You may have noticed that there is a new product called Mobility Express. You can use this ‘controller on an AP’. Here is a guide I co-authored for doing just this.

-Sam

Summary:

Cisco 802.11ac Wave 2 APs do not run IOS like previous platforms. This presents a challenge when trying to perform an AP on a Stick site survey with only a battery pack. The standalone mode for these Access Points is achieved using Mobility Express – or the function to use the integrated WLC on the Access Point to control the radio functionality in a standalone fashion.

Prerequisites:

  • 8.3MR1 code supporting Mobility Express for your Access Point
  • Local power source for your Access Point (AIR-PWR-C or site survey battery with sufficient power)
  • Operational Standalone or Virtual Wireless Lan Controller running 8.2MR2 or 8.3 for configuring the Access Point mode and moving the images
  • TFTP server
  • 802.11ac Wave 2 Access Point (Please note, the 1810 platform is not supported at the time of this writing)
  • A serial console cable to watch/configure your AP

Process:

Step 1) Join your Access Point to your local WLC as you would during a normal deployment.

For the 2800/3800 platforms, you must be running a minimum of 8.2MR2 or 8.3 for step 1. For 1830/1850, there is no similar requirement aside from running a release that supports those platforms. Please note that this is not the above referenced ME image version which will be used in step 2.

Step 2) Convert the Access Point to Mobility Express mode using the correct image.

This is accomplished by going to the console of the AP and logging in, then enabling, then using the ap-type command to convert the AP over to Mobility Express and download the new image from your TFTP server. To get the correct AP image file, you will need to decompress the image bundle and use the correct image for your AP platform. For example:

  • 1830/1850 you should use ap1g4
  • 2800/3800 you should use ap3g3

Note: You can also use the platform specific ME image from CCO if you have that available. If you’re using a Universal SKU AP, you should wait for it to regulatory prime before trying to convert the image to make sure you don’t incur a reboot mid-code change.

Once your AP goes down for a reboot, disconnect the LAN cable and ensure its powered by local power or your survey battery pack:

Step 3) Wait for your Access Point to boot completely.

At this point your Access Point will do several things. It will boot and you will see about 2 minutes of the following messages:

Once these timeout, the Access Point will boot the Mobility Express WLC automatically:

Step 4) Configure the WLC using the following values:

Would you like to terminate autoinstall? [yes]: yes
Enter Administrative User Name (24 characters max): admin
Enter Administrative Password (3 to 24 characters): Cisco123
Re-enter Administrative Password : Cisco123
System Name [Cisco_11:aa:1a] (31 characters max): ME_WLC
Enter Country Code list (enter ‘help’ for a list of countries) [US]: US
Configure a NTP server now? [YES][no]: no
Configure the system time now? [YES][no]: yes
Enter the date in MM/DD/YY format: <date>
Enter the time in HH:MM:SS format: <time>
Enter timezone location index (enter ‘help’ for a list of timezones): 7
Management Interface IP Address: 192.168.1.2
Management Interface Netmask: 255.255.255.0
Management Interface Default Router: 192.168.1.1
Create Management DHCP Scope? [yes][NO]: yes
DHCP Network : 192.168.1.0
DHCP Netmask : 255.255.255.0
Router IP: 192.168.1.1
Start DHCP IP address: 192.168.1.10
Stop DHCP IP address: 192.168.1.200
DomainName : me.local
DNS Server : [OPENDNS][user DNS] OPENDNS
Create Employee Network? [YES][no]: yes
Employee Network Name (SSID)?: survey_ME
NOTE, USE YOUR INITIALS INSTEAD OF ‘ME’ TO DIFFERENTIATE YOUR SSID
Employee VLAN Identifier? [MGMT][1-4095]: MGMT
Employee Network Security? [PSK][enterprise]: PSK
Employee PSK Passphrase (8-38 characters)?: <temp key>
Re-enter Employee PSK Passphrase: <temp key>
Create Guest Network? [yes][NO]: no
Enable RF Parameter Optimization? [YES][no]: no
Configuration correct? If yes, system will save it and reset. [yes][NO]: yes

It is highly recommended to use the values above. Once the Access Point reboots continue on.

Step 5) Clean up the AP

Some of the defaults are not completely friendly. We’ll clean those up now. Discover the name of the Access Point using ‘show ap summary’ and rename it to something more friendly like ‘ap’. It should be noted that renaming your Access Point to ‘ap’ will make configurations easier and in line with the examples below, but if you’re part of a larger team and require unique Access Point names, this is where you would set them, making note to use your defined Access Point name instead of the shortened name ‘ap’ as described in the rest of this document.

Next we want to disable the PSK security on the WLAN for easier association and testing and enable Aironet Extensions to include the AP name in beacons. This step is optional, but recommended. You must first disable the WLAN, the disable the PSK, then re-enable the WLAN:

(Cisco Controller) >config wlan disable 1
(Cisco Controller) >config wlan security wpa disable 1
(Cisco Controller) >config wlan ccx aironetIeSupport enable 1
(Cisco Controller) >config wlan enable 1
(Cisco Controller) >save config
Are you sure you want to save? (y/n) y

Once you’ve made these changes, perform a ‘save config’ as shown on the WLC to ensure the changes aren’t overwritten.

Step 6) Configure your radios for site survey specifics including channel and TX power.

To set these values, you must admin disable the radio, make the change, then re-enable it. Remember, these are the same commands you’d use on a production, bare-metal WLC and are not new. Here are a few examples:

To change the 2.4GHz radio to channel 6:
(Cisco Controller) >config 802.11b disable ap
(Cisco Controller) >config 802.11b channel ap ap 6
(Cisco Controller) >config 802.11b enable ap

To change the 2.4GHz radio to power level 3:
(Cisco Controller) >config 802.11b disable ap
(Cisco Controller) >config 802.11b txPower ap ap 3
(Cisco Controller) >config 802.11b enable ap

To change the 5GHz radio to channel 44:
(Cisco Controller) >config 802.11a disable ap
(Cisco Controller) >config 802.11a channel ap ap 44
(Cisco Controller) >config 802.11a enable ap

To change the 5GHz radio to power level 5:
(Cisco Controller) >config 802.11a disable ap
(Cisco Controller) >config 802.11a txpower ap ap 5
(Cisco Controller) >config 802.11a enable ap

To change the 5GHz radio width to 40MHz:
(Cisco Controller) >config 802.11a disable ap
(Cisco Controller) >config 802.11a chan_width ap 40
(Cisco Controller) >config 802.11a enable ap

Of course, you can couple all of these commands together to reduce the number of times you’re disabling your radio if you’re doing an initial configuration. Here is an example of setting the radios both to power level 2 and the 2.4GHz radio to channel 11, and the 5GHz channel to 100@40MHz all in one script:

(Cisco Controller) >config 802.11b disable ap
(Cisco Controller) >config 802.11a disable ap
(Cisco Controller) >config 802.11b channel ap ap 11
(Cisco Controller) >config 802.11b txPower ap ap 2
(Cisco Controller) >config 802.11a channel ap ap 100
(Cisco Controller) >config 802.11a txpower ap ap 2
(Cisco Controller) >config 802.11a chan_width ap 40
(Cisco Controller) >config 802.11b enable ap
(Cisco Controller) >config 802.11a enable ap

To see the channel of the Access Point currently configured, use the ‘show ap channel ap’ command:

To see the power level of the Access Point currently configured, use the ‘show ap config slot 0 ap’ (for 2.4GHz) or ‘show ap config slot 1 ap’ (for 5GHz’ command and look for the following data:

Alternatively, use the grep command to just pick out the data you’re interested in:

Step 7) Alternative management via the WLC GUI

If you’ve followed this guide up till now, you can also access the management interface of the WLC by using your PC and joining your open survey SSID. Then open a web browser and navigate to https://192.168.1.2/ .

Step 8) Putting it all back the way you found it

To convert the AP back to capwap mode and undo this configuration, you must goto the AP console using ‘apciscoshell’ and perform the ‘ap-type’ command again:

Addendum:

Dual role radio notes:

The AP2800 and AP3800 both include the ability to change the slot 0 radios personality from 2.4GHz to 5GHz. This presents some unique configuration considerations as follows:

To convert the XOR radio from the default 2.4GHz to 5GHz and change its channel to 40 @ 40MHz wide use:
(Cisco Controller) >config 802.11-abgn disable ap
(Cisco Controller) >config 802.11-abgn role ap manual client-serving
(Cisco Controller) >config 802.11-abgn band ap ap 5GHz
(Cisco Controller) >config 802.11-abgn channel ap ap 40
(Cisco Controller) >config 802.11-abgn chan_width ap 40
(Cisco Controller) >config 802.11-abgn enable ap

The following should be noted for this configuration:

When you convert the XOR radio into 5GHz mode, you must use a channel that is 100MHz apart from the slot 1 radio in the Access Point. When you configure the XOR radio into 5GHz mode on an ‘e’ model of AP, you must have an external antenna plugged into the DART connector or this configuration will fail. When you configure the XOR radio into 5GHz mode on an ‘i’ model of AP, the tx power will be fixed and not modifiable (by design) to its lowest possible value to retain micro-cell integrity.

To change the XOR radio from a configured 5GHz to 2.4GHz and change its channel to 6 use:

(Cisco Controller) >config 802.11-abgn disable ap
(Cisco Controller) >config 802.11-abgn band ap ap 2.4GHz
(Cisco Controller) >config 802.11-abgn channel ap ap 6
(Cisco Controller) >config 802.11-abgn enable ap

Please stop asking for an 802.11ac site survey

You are likely reading this post at the recommendation of someone. You have likely asked something along the lines of ‘Will you do an 802.11ac site survey for me?”. This is an easy mistake to make, and I hope that this clarifies a few things for you. First and most importantly, any site survey should always start with the customer requirements, then you position the technology to fit those requirements. If you ask me for an 802.11ac survey, this means that you want a deployment that supports 802.11ac modulation. Modulation occurs at most areas of your cell and as you get further away from your Access Point, your speed decreases, but this does not mean that you don’t ‘get an 802.11ac data rates’. The 802.11ac specification allows for as low as 6.5Mb/s and as high as ‘gigabit wifi’ and all sorts of speeds in-between. With 802.11b/g/n it was possible to ask for ‘the best, and make it pervasive’ and you could theoretically design an environment to support the highest supported data rates in all locations. With 802.11ac, this is no longer possible due to the very strong signal strengths required and the very wide channels required to achieve ‘max throughput’. It is unreasonable to expect an enterprise wireless deployment to support 1300Mbps (or whatever your Access Points spec sheet claims as the max) in all locations for all clients.

If you ask for an 802.11ac site survey without any other clarifications, you can safely expect massive cell sizes and generally poor throughput which is likely not what you want. Examining your Access Points data sheet will give you some idea of the wide range of signal strengths required (not to mention channel widths) to support a variety of 802.11ac data rates. The Cisco AP3700 data sheet for example, shows that -61dBm is required to support VHT80, MCS 9, 3 spatial streams (the ‘highest 802.11ac’ supported on the Access Point at 1300Mbps) all the way down to -92dBm for VHT20, MCS 0, 1 spatial stream (the ‘lowest 802.11ac’ supported on the Access Point at 6.5Mbps). All of these qualify as ‘supporting 802.11ac’. This wide swing in capabilities is the reason that you cannot simply ask for ‘an 802.11ac site survey’. Instead, you should always start by gathering your requirements upfront:

  • What are my throughput requirements?*
  • What are my density requirements?*
  • What are my client types?*

Then turn those expectations into leveraging a technology for the deployment. If you do not set those expectations upfront, or have a good understanding of what your clients requirements are, how can you claim success? You need to mutually agree upon design requirements, then prove that design back in whatever fashion you agree on. Set expectations, design for those expectations, meet those expectations, then prove that you’ve met those expectations. And please, stop asking for an 802.11ac site survey.

* There are many things that go into a proper RF design, not to mention supporting other applications such as BYOD technologies that I’m intentionally glossing over. This is just a small sampling of some of the questions you can use to suss out your customer requirements and is by no means the only way of doing it.

Wireless Tech Field 2 – Recap and first looks

This past week, I attended the Gestalt IT Wireless Tech Field 2 event hosted by several leaders of the wireless industry in San Jose, CA. The Tech Field day events are an opportunity for vendors and manufacturers to get in front of a highly focused group of delegates to tell their own story, on their own playing field. The Wireless specific event is the brainchild of Steven Foskett and Jennifer Huber and I consider myself privileged to have been able to participate in this very prestigious event – now for the second time! This event was sponsored by industry leaders in the wireless space – Aerohive, Meraki, MetaGeek, Ekahau, Aruba, HP, and Ruckus (in order of visit). The delegates for the event were given the opportunity to meet with these companies, in many instances at their home offices, to share first hand their stories and visions for what they feel is the market drivers in the wireless space as well as their respective visions for what the future of wireless is going to bring. This post will be the first of several as I dive into each of our sessions with many of the vendors and share my take on the vendors, their products, and how I perceive them to fit ‘in the industry’.

This Wireless Tech Field day was preceded by the first wireless symposium where members of the industry and media were invited to participate in an open discussion on the future of wireless with a focus in particular on upcoming technologies 802.11ac/ad (gigabit WiFi), 802.11u (Hotspot 2.0), and Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) technologies. Devin Akin (Aerohive), Carlos Gomez (Aruba), Paul Congdon (HP Labs), and GT Hill (Ruckus) treated us to their vision of how these topics will shape and form the foreseeable future in the wireless industry. I’ll also be exploring these various topics in upcoming blog posts, so consider that a teaser! 🙂

Each of the sponsors of the WFD event each brought something special or different to the table. I think one of the most important things I learned during the event is that, when given the opportunity, each manufacturer tells a compelling story when given the opportunity to. I consider myself a fairly impartial technologist so it was refreshing to be able to receive these messages in their native, or ‘best case’ format highlighting the various strengths that each company has to offer:

Aerohive continues on their self-proclaimed mission to rid the world of controllers. Aerohive is rolling along with their ‘protocols are free’ mantra to bring solutions rapidly to market in a low-cost, easy to deploy fashion. Their cooperative control architecture enables many of the features of a centralized controller based solution and they are extending this into the routing world with the introduction of the BR-100 branch edge router. This device is managed ‘by the cloud’ – by either using the Hive Manager Online solution that is hosted by Aerohive or hosting your own ‘private cloud’ instance of the rapidly evolving NMS.

Meraki, to be perfectly frank, was perceived by many of the delegates as the ‘underdog’ of the event and many of us had some pretty negative preconceptions of who they were and what they do. I think it’s safe to say that Meraki portrayed a strong showing overall and rapidly showed the room at large that they’re clearly more than a niche player in the wireless space. They showed off their NMS platform and gave us some ‘under the hood’ insights into their operations overall. The way Meraki is able to manage and aggregate data from the vast (that word seems woefully insufficient) deployment of edge Access Points was staggering.

MetaGeek once again showed off to the TFD delegates. Last year at the first TFD event, they stole the show by showing off their low cost – feature rich PC based spectrum analyzer product. This year, demonstrating the agility that is impossible in a larger organization, they showed off their extension of ‘wireless visualization’ products – Eye P.A. This play on a TLA stems from their ‘eyeball’ view of Packet Analysis. As an organization that is clearly focused on getting information to a place that its easy to understand, they presented (showed off?) a pre-release version of this product. It’s safe to say that all of the delegates were blown away by the unique and innovative show of application development. MetaGeek has sprung up from seemingly nowhere to make a name for themselves in a technology that is exciting and that knows no growth boundaries.

Ekahau came to the table with their site survey product ESS (Ekahau Site Survey), the mobile version of their vision for tablet-based site surveys, and their tags. As an avid user of competing site survey products, I can clearly see that I’ll be rethinking my overall approach to performing the most important part of a wireless deployment – the site survey. I look forward to some hands on time with their android tablet compatible piece of this software. This is clearly a place that the major competitors are deficient in and Ekahau stands to be the first to market with an exciting product. Almost running out of time at the event, we got a very quick overview of their RTLS tag for wifi based deployments. As a side note to the Ekahau team directly, you have enough exciting things to talk about that maybe next time two sessions would be appropriate. 🙂

Aruba brought out the big guns during their sessions showing off their Aruba Instant product – essentially a wireless controller running on an AP. Those of you familiar with the now all-but-defunct WDS can consider this WDS in a fully automated, steroid enhanced feature set enabling rapid deployments of premise-based and managed lightweight deployments. After a good discussion regarding Spectrum Analysis, we dove off into the BYOD deep end with a realtime display of managing guest devices including a strong iOS MDM application utilizing products from their recent Amigopod acquisition.

HP gave the delegates a good overview of their 3×3:3 wireless Access Points including their newly launched outdoor product the MSM-466R. They also showed off their newest member of their controller line the MSM720 including some fervently discussed licensing features such as a discreet ‘advanced feature set’ as well as the ability to pool AP licenses across controllers.

Ruckus closed out the event with us by bringing a deep dive discussion regarding their approach to RF management. Ruckus gets top marks for their no holds barred approach to interacting with the delegates. Future sponsors of the event can take a page from their book – using a combination of geek + relevance to the table. Hands down, Ruckus had the room enthralled by the discussions and philosophies surround their approach to the market – no small feat for the last sponsor of the event.

Needless to say, the WFD event was exciting, exhausting, fun, and educational for everyone involved. As a delegate, I received a variety of products and marketing swag from the vendors with the understanding that I’m under no obligation to do anything with it that I don’t want to. The opinions that I intend to express from evaluating and trying out these products are my own and I’m also under no obligation to be positive or sway my opinion based on any gifts, equipment, or swag I have received. I look forward to digging deeper into these manufacturers and sharing what I feel and offering my honest, direct opinions on them. I hope you’ll stay tuned for future posts where I discuss the event, sponsors and products!

Securing your small WiFi tools

I find myself lugging around a variety of tools recently – more so than I usually do courtesy of #TechFieldDay. While I typically carry a Spectrum Analyzer, it is usually one of those ‘dedicated pockets in the laptop bag’ kind of tools that gets packed in with my trusty CB21AG survey card. Those of you keeping notes would realize that any machine purchased in the last 3 years or so is lacking a CardBus slot so we’ve been relegated to keeping our old machines around for compatibility with our trusty tools or using a clunky ExpressCard to CardBus adapter if we want to keep compatible. This works okay if your new machine sports a shiny new ExpressCard slot but those of us moving (back) to the Mac platform and not wanting to chunk out the change for a 17 inch Mac Book Pro which has the coveted ExpressCard slot but weighs a ton (not good for survey work!).

The answer? USB. Most everything has a work-alike or a preferred card that is USB so I find myself with:

Orinoco 8494 card for the AirMagnet products (Survey, and WiFi Analyzer)

MetaGeek Wi-Spy DBx with device finder antenna

AirMagnet Spectrum XT

and to round it all out, a Ralink (thanks @sevanjaniyan) based adapter for compatibility with WildPackets Omnipeek for next weeks CWAP Beta class!

The challenge: All of these things have been rolling around in my bag (in the WiSpy DBx box actually) which is a less than graceful way to treat your tools. I needed a sturdy case that could hold it all and not be so large I wouldn’t want to pack it wherever I went. Enter the Pelican 1120 case. With inside dimensions of 7.25″ x 4.75″ x 3.06″, it’s the smallest ‘small case’ they make. Being a fan of the larger 1510 case for my survey gear, and being priced (with shipping) for a modest $35, it was pretty well a done deal. Pictures of my handywork (pick and pluck style) to follow:


Hands on with the AirMagnet Spectrum XT

AirMagnet Spectrum XT is the second generation of spectrum analyzers to carry the AirMagnet name. The XT is a USB connected device whereas the previous model was a 32-bit CardBus version (OEM’d from Cognio). AirMagnet was gracious enough to host a session at the recent Wireless TechField Day event and we got to spend some quality time with the AirMagnet team discussing the WiFi Analyzer (protocol analyzer) and the Spectrum XT product.

Begin RF Background (okay to skip if you’re a seasoned Wi-Fi guru): WiFi (802.11a/b/g/n) runs in frequencies that are unlicensed by regulatory bodies. Here in the US, that is the FCC. This generally means that anyone can do anything they want in those ranges and they commonly do! People running non-WiFi devices in the 2.4 and 5GHz spaces can often cause interference for wireless networks causing poor performance, intermittent connectivity, or outright failures of wireless networks – especially in the very crowded 2.4GHz range. End RF Background

This being the second iteration of Spectrum Analyzers from AirMagnet, much of my opinions come from using the previous model which was OEM’s from Cognio. Cognio was acquired by Cisco and the old product was relabeled the Cisco Spectrum Expert. All 3 of the CardBus products (Cognio, AirMagnet, Cisco) share a similar (same) codebase and the new Spectrum XT product appears to be a rewrite from the ground up. This brings with it a new interface into the product including views such as the Spectrum Density view. This also brings some quirks for those of us that are familiar with (expecting) one or features from the old application. The USB form factor was easy to manipulate and a welcome change from the CardBus only solution that has forced many of us to resort to the cumbersome ExpressCard to CardBus adapters.

Spectrum Analyzer CardBus with Spectrum XT USB

Spectrum Analyzer CardBus with Spectrum XT USB

The AirMagnet dance of acquiring a license, User Access Control dialogue box, unsigned drivers and no ‘proper’ SSL cert on their My Airmagnet site aside, the installation was relatively straightforward on my Mac running Fusion and Windows 7. It should be noted that in this configuration, Spectrum XT has no direct access to the built in WiFi adapter on the Mac so you’ll either need to reboot into BootCamp or attach a supported USB wireless adapter to be able to pickup SSIDs.

None of us like dealing with SSL certs, but seriously?

UAC Errors are so Vista... I know you can work around them, but should you *have* to?

The main interface of the application sports numerous easy-to-digest views including the new Spectrum Density view, a Real Time FFT with Avg, Max, and Max-Hold views, and the Spectrogram (historical waterfall) view. The less obvious components of the screen along the left side reveal some pretty important data being hidden such as the Duty Cycle listed per-channel and the Interferers and Devices pane. As you can see from my screenshot, I must be doing something wrong because there is a tab for Bluetooth devices and my Bluetooth device isn’t showing up there – it’s showing up in the Non-WiFi Interferer tab. Clearly there is at minimum some ambiguous terminology here that must be explored further – this didn’t seem to be the case with the Cognio card.

Easy to read even if the Bluetooth is sorted wrong.

The card is a touch on the wide side so if you have USB ports that are close together, you’ll want to use the included USB extension cable or a 3rd party USB hub. If you’ve got a Mac setup, it should be noted that with a USB hub, you can easily attach a supported wireless adapter and have a fully functioning product running within a VM.

The addition of SNMP integration makes this application easy to plug into monitoring systems to to trap out to. A nice addition for those of us looking to leave something in the field at a remote location for a few days to ‘watch the air’. Integration with the AirMagnet Survey pro application rounds out the major feature list. Those of us that survey using AirMagnet products, this is a must have for Spectrum integration during surveys.

There is a short list of conspicuously missing features that reveal the somewhat young state of the application – especially if you know and love the CardBus products. Those are exporting your interference devices list and the ability to modify your views to the n-th degree. Expect a slight learning curve for those new to the product. The XT product appears to only allow a max of four displays whereas the legacy product would allow for as many as could fit your screen (I typically used 6 depending on the environment). These outstanding seemingly cosmetic issues I expect will be fixed eventually, but do make sure your support contracts are up to date – AirMagnet can be especially finicky about version releases and they appear to have moved to the traditional AirMagnet licensing scheme (a la Survey Pro and WiFi Analyzer) and away from ‘the card is the license’ that the last product used. Those of us that travel with every tool installer handy (for those sans-Internet times), make sure you download an extra copy of your .lic file and keep it with the app!

AirMagnet Spectrum XT product page

Gestalt IT (Tech Field Day organizers)

In all, the Spectrum XT is a great spectrum analyzer with a slightly different application from the previous model. This means that it’s not going to be a drop-in replacement for those of you looking to move off of the CardBus model – especially if you export identified devices for inclusion into your site-survey report. I’m hoping that these features come soon (I’ve provided this feedback to AirMagnet) and when these and a few of the other last few software tatters get cleaned up, I expect this to become the defacto enterprise-grade survey product.

Editors note: After contact with AirMagnet, the ‘device export’ function is apparently being addressed and should be available in an upcoming patch.

Full disclosure: I was a delegate for the first ever Wireless Tech Field Day event organized by Stephen Foskett and GestaltIT This event was sponsored by Meta-Geek as well as other presenters including payment of accommodations for all delegates. Evaluation product was distributed to delegates for hands-on exposure for this review without promise or commitment to provide any feedback, positive or negative. Professionally, I work for a VAR which provides services for industry leading technology manufacturers. The views expressed on this blog are my personal opinion and do not necessarily reflect opinions my employer.