Surveying with a 3502 (followup post)

As a followup to my previous post on surveying with Cisco 3502 series Access Points, I’ve been playing around with a few options that ultimately get the job done. As you may recall, the Cisco 3502i Access Points have different radios in them than then 1142 Access Point making the 1142 an unsuitable substitute for a site survey for those customers looking for a literal real-world picture of what a 3502 deployment will look like. Because I have several customers that won’t accept an 1142 substitute survey for a 3502i deployment, I’ve been wrestling with the best way to get this done.

  Since there was no autonomous image available, the best alternative has been to join a 3502 up to a controller, put it in H-REAP mode with a static IP address and use the same IP address as the Access Points default gateway. This prevented the AP from feeling stranded and rebooting every 15 minutes (hard to do a survey when that’s happening).
  Recently a little birdie from Cisco called me (you know who you are and thanks!) and let me know that the 1262 Autonomous code has been posted to CCO and that since the 1262 and the 3502i/e share radio chipsets, there is a good chance that the Autonomous image would work across all three models. I decided to give it a go and here’s what that attempt looked like:
Tools used:
1) PC with it’s IP address set to 10.0.0.2/24
2) running a TFTP server
3) the following IOS images from CCO: ap3g1-k9w7-tar.124-25d.JA.tar (6.5M) and ap3g1-rcvk9w8-tar.124-23c.JA.tar (2.3M)
4) A 3502 Access Point with a local power supply attached to the PC and a console connection to the AP to watch the fun!
To convert to autonomous image:
Step 1) Duplicate your ap3g1-k9w7-tar.124-25d.JA.tar image (the larger of the two) and rename it to ap3g1-k9w7-tar.default. Place this file in the root of your TFTP server.
Step 2) Depress the MODE button on your AP and power it up – release the MODE button when the LED on front turns red.
Step 3) Watch the image download
It should look something like:
button is pressed, wait for button to be released…
button pressed for 22 seconds
process_config_recovery: set IP address and config to default 10.0.0.1
process_config_recovery: image recovery
image_recovery: Download default IOS tar image tftp://255.255.255.255/ap3g1-k9w7-tar.default


Unable to create temp dir “flash:/update”
examining image…
extracting info (283 bytes)
Image info:
    Version Suffix: k9w7-.124-25d.JA
    Image Name: ap3g1-k9w7-mx.124-25d.JA
    Version Directory: ap3g1-k9w7-mx.124-25d.JA
    Ios Image Size: 5673472
    Total Image Size: 6502912
    Image Feature: WIRELESS LAN
    Image Family: AP3G1
    Wireless Switch Management Version: 7.0.94.21
Extracting files…
ap3g1-k9w7-mx.124-25d.JA/ (directory) 0 (bytes)
ap3g1-k9w7-mx.124-25d.JA/html/ (directory) 0 (bytes)
Once the image completes downloading, your AP should reboot. At that point, you should have a fully functional 3502i/e Access Point (less Spectrum Expert functionality of course) running autonomous code that you can then use to survey with!
Once you’re done with your site survey, if you no longer need your survey AP to be running autonomous code and want to put it back to lightweight mode, you can do the following:
To convert to lightweight image:
Step 1) Duplicate your ap3g1-rcvk9w8-tar.124-23c.JA.tar image (the smaller of the two) and rename it to ap3g1-k9w7-tar.default. Place this file in the root of your TFTP server.
Step 2) Depress the MODE button on your AP and power it up – release the MODE button when the LED on front turns red.
Step 3) Watch the image download
It should look something like:
Waiting for PHY auto negotiation to complete… done
Ethernet speed is 1000 Mb – FULL duplex
button is pressed, wait for button to be released…
button pressed for 21 seconds
process_config_recovery: set IP address and config to default 10.0.0.1
process_config_recovery: image recovery
image_recovery: Download default IOS tar image tftp://255.255.255.255/ap3g1-k9w7-tar.default


Unable to create temp dir “flash:/update”
examining image…
extracting info (274 bytes)
Image info:
    Version Suffix: rcvk9w8-
    Image Name: ap3g1-rcvk9w8-mx
    Version Directory: ap3g1-rcvk9w8-mx
    Ios Image Size: 2284032
    Total Image Size: 2284032
    Image Feature: WIRELESS LAN|LWAPP|RECOVERY
    Image Family: AP3G1
    Wireless Switch Management Version: 7.0.94.21
Extracting files…
ap3g1-rcvk9w8-mx/ (directory) 0 (bytes)
extracting ap3g1-rcvk9w8-mx/ap3g1-rcvk9w8-mx (2281426 bytes)……………………………….
Once that completes, your AP should be ‘back to normal’. If you find any residual config on the AP, once it joins back up to your controller, you may want to do a ‘Clear All Config’ from the AP page.
Some things to note are:
1) Most Windows installations will hide your file extensions by default. Don’t forget to remove the .tar extension from your file names when you’re moving them around else your TFTP server may throw a ‘file not found’ error.
2) Watch your console connection. I’ve seen it ask for the filename of ap3g1-k9w7-tar.default as well as c3500-k9w7-tar.default.  Just watch for the image name that it’s looking for and rename your image accordingly.

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Busy weeks!

  So, it’s been a few weeks since I’ve had a chance to post anything and there’s been quite a bit going on! Firstly, I spent a few days in Atlanta coming up to speed on the Mobile Access VE Solution for low-cost indoor cell repeating utilizing your existing CAT5,6,7 cabling. I can’t wait to get dug into an install – quite a different mindset from wifi to cellular.
http://www.mobileaccess.com/products-services/p/category/mobileaccessve

  After that, spent a few days in San Jose for the Cisco Partner VT meetings and learned about all sorts of up coming new stuff from Cisco that can’t be talked about yet – infact, that’s probably the biggest reason that I’ve been somewhat quiet recently – being wrapped up in NDA style information makes it hard to be social. 🙂
Contribution to the https://www.myciscocommunity.com/ page netted me a Cisco Cius when they’re available. Thanks to Vic Nunes for making that happen!

  Upcoming in March (17th and 18th) is the Wireless Tech Field day in San Jose that I’m quite excited to be a part of! The fine folks over at Gestalt IT that put on the ‘regular’ Tech Field day have teamed up to host one specifically focused on wireless technologies. I was selected as a delegate and look very forward to my first Field Day. I think the list of presenters is being firmed up but I’m glad to hear about the ones that are lined up! Details on the event are at:
http://gestaltit.com/field-day/2011-wireless/

Looking forward to meeting Stephen Foskett and hanging with wireless powerhouses like @jenniferlucille and @MarcusBurton among all of the other delegates that have confirmed.

3502 surveying

So, rumor has it, if you put your 3502 in H-REAP mode, and statically assign your IP address and your default-gateway as your static host IP address, you can survey. Need to try this when I get back to civilization in January. I expect this will require some sort of loopback slug and a POE pass-through. Gonna have to bust out the crimpers! 🙂

New H-REAP ‘feature’ in WLC 7.0 code

This just in from:

When a Hybrid REAP access point enters into a standalone mode, the following occurs:

The access point checks whether it is able to reach the default gateway via ARP. If so, it will continue to try and reach the controller.

If the access point fails to establish the ARP, the following will occur.

The access point attempts to discover for five times and if it still cannot find the controller, it tries to renew the DHCP on the ethernet interface to get a new DHCP IP.

The access point will retry for five times, and if that fails, the access point will renew the IP address of the interface again, this will happen for three attempts.

If the three attemps fail, the access point will fall back to the static IP and will reboot (only if the access point is configured with a static IP).

Reboot is done to remove the possibility of any unknown error the access point configuration.

Once the access point reestablishes a connection with the controller, it disassociates all clients, applies new configuration information from the controller, and reallows client connectivity.


This means no more site surveys with lightweight Access Points running in H-REAP mode since there is no pingable default gateway. AC UPS to power a POE switch? Too bulky and hard to travel with in my book! Looks like we’ll be reverting to a ‘best guess’ survey till some Autonomous code surfaces…

Cisco WLC Config Analyzer version 2.2.3

Is available at:
If you use more than one WLC, you need this. Great way to sync configurations, check for common errors, etc. Now displays Persistent Devices from CleanAir Access Points!

Cisco launches a low cost 802.11n Access Point

Details on the 1040 can be found at:
Note the following caveats:
Slower CPU so less overall PPS compared to the 1140
2×2 MIMO
No client link
No media stream
Runs on standard POE and available in controller based or standalone. Should be a great alternative for those of you suffering from Aruba-itis. 🙂

Cisco announces 4 WLC Vulnerabilities

Including:
IKE DoS Vulnerability
HTTP DoS Vulnerability
Privilege Escalation Vulnerabilities
ACL Bypass Vulnerabilities

Details can be found at:
Of interesting note is the recommendation that all non-FIPS 5.x customers migrate to 6.0. Something we all knew anyways, but this is certainly compelling enough reason to get moved sooner rather than later. For most of us, 4.2.209.0 and 6.0.199.0 (.4) are the target code versions.
 -Sam